Daily Dose

Love Letter to Fusion

Kara Posted by Kara Love Letter to Fusion

Dear Fusion,

I’ve been working up the courage to tell you this for a while now. Maybe you’ve already guessed it — I have a crush on you.

I know we haven’t known each other for very long, but the time we spend together is amazing. You’ve taught me so many new things and now that I’ve met you I feel like I can do anything. You challenge me and I like that, because when I’m around you I want to be the best version of myself.

Most importantly, we have fun together. We’ve had adventures and made memories that I know will last me a lifetime.

I hope I’m not coming on too strong, but when I wake up in the morning, it’s you I think about and I can’t wait until we’re together again. I know we won’t be seeing as much of each other soon, and that makes me a little sad … but I remind myself that you’re not going to be out of my life completely. I hope it’s OK if I come visit for lunches, a game of ping pong, or just to see what’s new.

I guess in the end what I really wanted to say was thanks for everything, now that I’ve met you, the future looks bright.

Yours truly,
Dave Jr.

The Winnipeg Renaissance: How effective social media is driving culture & business

Jay Posted by Jay The Winnipeg Renaissance: How effective social media is driving culture & business

The Exchange District; just of the many hubs of social activity that's shaping Winnipeg's culture.

If 'man is the measure of all things', then 'the people are the measure of all things in Winnipeg', and the Peg is beaming with great people doing incredible things.

It's no secret that Winnipeg has turned a corner from down-and-out fly-over city, to must-experience, culture-hub on many travellers wish lists. Part reinvention and part rebirth, the Keystone province's capital city has most certainly renewed the creative spirits of Peggers, old and new. With boutiques, coffee shops, cocktail bars, arts, music, festivals and much more, the Peg has been stepping up its game in a big way.

However, this post isn't a love-in for all the hipsters to tweet about, haters to hate about, or scenesters to... scene about. Instead, it's an observation on the tools, technologies, and methodologies which have helped spark this Renaissance. Just as the invention of movable type began spreading ideas during the second half of the 15th century (and well beyond), a new form of communication has helped spread the word of local arts, music, cuisine, entertainment, fashion and more in today's day and age. And just as Gutenberg's printing press brought technology which had a profound impact on all areas of life for centuries to follow, so to have new technologies had a major impact on modern life. Digital marketing, specifically social media, has democratized the ability for Winnipeg's independent business community to reach large groups of people with more connectedness than ever before.

But having a soap-box isn't enough. Just because you have a mega-phone doesn't necessarily mean people will listen to what you have to say. The smart local entrepreneurs, the ones who are doing social right (see Albert St. Cocktail, King+Bannatyne, Bronuts, to name a few) are following best practices; consistent tone-of-voice and visual-style, mixed with user-generated content, customer-engagement and tasteful promotion. While start-ups may yet to have budgets that support mixing traditional media with their digital efforts, they can look to other local brands such as St. Vital Centre for inspiration through their effective use of outdoor, radio, and print advertising in cross-promoting their marketing strategy.

When integrated correctly, digital and traditional marketing can be cost-effective, interactive, and memorable in a way that doesn't focus on interrupting people, but rather on engaging with them. As a full-service ad agency with nearly three decades of experience, Fusion has seen the arrival and passing of many trends (can you xerox that for me?), technologies (remember pagers?), and fads (QR codes, just don't.) - and through it all we have helped our clients be successful by approaching each business challenge with sound strategy, smart tactics, and compelling creative.

What others had to say:

Great post Jay! I wholeheartedly believe in what you are saying and what it implies. I love what's happening in our neighbourhood and in Winnipeg. What a change from when we first arrived in the Exchange. There's another post on that somewhere in this blog.

Just one thing...I never had a pager.

Posted by: Dave | March 23, 2016

There as definately a lot to find out about this subject. I really like all of the points you made.

Posted by: http://www.sohbethatlarix.site | March 28, 2016

Stop and Smell the Sawdust

Morris Posted by Morris

Four easy steps to designing and building your own social media site.

If you’re a creative professional and you ever find that the ephemeral advertising/marketing/graphic design world that the fruits of your labour live and (usually pretty quickly) die in is needing a little out-of-office boost this project might be right up your alley.

Step 1: rescue castoff old headboard from your father’s woodpile
Step 2: deconstruct (discovering six beautiful oak boards and maple bedposts under the awful, thick, poop-brown stain – notice that the backs of the oak boards, unfinished, and with pronounced saw marks, are actually way nicer than the “finished” side – then while looking at your pile of wood start to imagine
Step 3: recruit a cardboard box to help hold up your deconstructed pieces and using the pictures in your head start moving the wood around (having a few clamps to hold stuff together will be an asset)
Step 4: add poplar accents in tribute to the woodpile, tweak idea, cut wood to finished sizes, assemble, paint and stain.

You’ll find that limited tools and even less experience in woodworking needn’t hold you back. Lessons learned from your career – about things like contrast, scale and proportion – will prove to be beneficial. And in the end, you’ll have a mobile social media device that could even outlive Instagram, Twitter, Facebook et al. If used correctly it will be a site where you can combine pretty much all social media – keep in touch with your freinds – talk about the news – share your likes – network – and you’ll even straighten your neck, smell smells and touch something other than a flat piece of glass – with no limits on words or characters or data.

Taking time to stop and smell the roses did me a world of good.

(I acknowledge the irony in the fact that I’ve had to resort to using social media to make a cheeky statement about social media.) (What effect will using the word poop in this story have on our search engine optimization?)

What others had to say:

I missed this earlier... the "p" word must not have made it through the filters on my social media feeds ;) It's beautiful! Are you taking commissions? What might you find in the woodpile for my house?

Posted by: Claudine | February 3, 2016

Yes, I’m a hater.

Morris Posted by Morris

As most Canadians already know, Winnipeg was in the nation’s spotlight last week as we played host to the 103rd Grey Cup game. At his state-of-the-union address in the days leading up to the big game commissioner Jeffrey Orridge unveiled a new logo and promotional video branded with the slogan “What we’re made of” for the Canadian Football League.

The image on the left is the new CFL logo, accompanied in the row by its direct descendants. The three laces in the new symbol, the unveil told, are a nod to the three downs in the Canadian game. Will anyone seeing it for the first time without explanation pick that out? I doubt it. And didn’t graphic designers already exhaust the slivered arc in logos much earlier this century? The presence of the maple leaf, the unveil also told, is proudly Canadian, though I find it disproportionately tiny and insignificant. The claim was that the new logo is modern and young (of which I am neither) so they may not care what I think. But I am a passionate fan and know that my first reaction is similar to most of the reactions I’ve heard and read – I don’t like it. In fact, my first reaction was “I hate it.”

In fairness to the league, the new logo was easy to read from a distance on the field. And though the promo spot didn’t do much for me when I first saw it on my iPad I thought it, and the logo, looked great in high def on a large flatscreen during the game.

The league hopes the brand transformation will bring new, younger fans to a game that has flatlined in attendance and dropped in television ratings of late. The new marketing efforts will include apparel from adidas (I saw a guy wearing a hat with the new logo so large I’d need a five head, not a forehead, to make it wearable), and there will be revamped websites and mobile apps for the league and its teams to better connect with fans. As a sports fan in general, and huge fan of our three down football, real-time statistical updates and league information at my fingertips is something I desire. I’ve always felt in past that the CFL was lacking in fulfilling that desire.

The league’s new website (cfl.ca) launches on Wednesday. “There will be more to come. Much more to come,” is what Orridge said at the unveil.

I’m hoping he can deliver on that promise and I’m sure I’ll eventually warm up to the new brand. I really hate being a hater.

A look into a virtual future of advertising

Dave Posted by Dave

 

In 2008, I took a bit of a leap from my then 16 year old advertising agency to form a technology company with investors and developers and some crazy ideas. That has been one of the most transformative experiences in my business life. But that’s not what I want to talk about here.

Our first rollercoaster ride was into virtual reality. In 2008, when nobody was there and Facebook probably hadn’t heard of the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset (which they bought in 2014 for $2 billion), we built a virtual world online dating site because it had been proven that daters would go to that very elusive second date if they experienced each other virtually first.

Then we thought Augmented Reality might be an interesting adjunct to VR, which is a way of meshing the real world with the digital. Think – you’re looking through your iPad screen via its camera and when it sees your friend it turns him or her into Chewbacca from Star Wars. As she walks around, she is Chewbacca as long as you keep looking at her through the iPad screen. (It had to recognize your friend first and then wrap her in Chewbacca skin.)

We were early with both these innovative technologies and we later discovered that they had huge opportunities in marketing (see video above). The times are changing and the market is ready for virtual and augmented reality.

We see virtual reality being used already in tourism where you see the place you’d love to visit in virtual reality – as if you are there. We see augmented reality in allowing you to try on clothes virtually, using both VR and AR to accurately size you. We also see it in amazing form in this example of demonstrating a refrigerator without having to go to the store.  LG Fridge example

What do you think about these new experiential technologies and how much more likely you would buy if you could use them in your shopping experience?