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How do you trust?

Dave Posted by Dave How do you trust?

I watched a very interesting short video that was sent to me by our digital media strategist, Misha. It makes you think about the future of trust in brands.

The concept of the story is that trust, so important to buying, is not as believable coming from brands as it once was. Sanjay Nazerali, CSO of Carat Global, says that the way trust is earned has changed among consumers.

He suggests that a hundred years ago, trust came from beliefs based on faith and the stories that we found in books. Then consumerism in the likes of Coca Cola and other age-old brands took the stories successfully into advertising and television, and built trust there. Now, he says, we no longer trust the stories put out by brands and look to our social networks for what we need to hear or see to trust in a brand.

An example he uses is one we all can all relate to – you see a great ad for crisp new sheets plus a better experience at a hotel but find on Trip Advisor that 200 people just like me say the experience was not so great. Peer-to-peer experiences and social media are becoming the avenue to trust by consumers.

The video starts with the idea that “ad-blocking” technologies mean something is wrong, that we’re not doing it right.

Check the 5+ minute clip here.

18+ minute version with Robert De Nero here.

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Posted by: Larry Jones | February 7, 2017

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Meet Jay Leslie

Dave Posted by Dave Meet Jay Leslie

Big news! I’m thrilled to announce the newest member of our team, Jay Leslie. 

Jay joins us as an Account Manager and strengthens our team with a decade of experience in design, marketing and brand consultancy. He comes to us from National Leasing, where he lead an in-house agency team of five, and focused on building their digital marketing strategy through lead generation, website development, blogging, video production, and a robust ppc platform. His experience as an entrepreneur is invaluable to me because he knows what it means to start a company, and how it feels to spend your hard earned money on marketing. 

Since starting at Fusion, Jay has already been getting his feet wet with new and existing client business. I am pleased to have Jay on board and look forward to doing great things together. 

A look into a virtual future of advertising

Dave Posted by Dave

 

In 2008, I took a bit of a leap from my then 16 year old advertising agency to form a technology company with investors and developers and some crazy ideas. That has been one of the most transformative experiences in my business life. But that’s not what I want to talk about here.

Our first rollercoaster ride was into virtual reality. In 2008, when nobody was there and Facebook probably hadn’t heard of the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset (which they bought in 2014 for $2 billion), we built a virtual world online dating site because it had been proven that daters would go to that very elusive second date if they experienced each other virtually first.

Then we thought Augmented Reality might be an interesting adjunct to VR, which is a way of meshing the real world with the digital. Think – you’re looking through your iPad screen via its camera and when it sees your friend it turns him or her into Chewbacca from Star Wars. As she walks around, she is Chewbacca as long as you keep looking at her through the iPad screen. (It had to recognize your friend first and then wrap her in Chewbacca skin.)

We were early with both these innovative technologies and we later discovered that they had huge opportunities in marketing (see video above). The times are changing and the market is ready for virtual and augmented reality.

We see virtual reality being used already in tourism where you see the place you’d love to visit in virtual reality – as if you are there. We see augmented reality in allowing you to try on clothes virtually, using both VR and AR to accurately size you. We also see it in amazing form in this example of demonstrating a refrigerator without having to go to the store.  LG Fridge example

What do you think about these new experiential technologies and how much more likely you would buy if you could use them in your shopping experience? 

How to have a Great Memory

Dave Posted by Dave How to have a Great Memory

This may seem like a “well duh” moment, but the best way to improve your memory is to pay attention. It’s not really a duh moment as most of us don’t really pay attention when we need to. That’s why we often forget a person's name right after we hear it. Our mind is on other things, like what to say next or what she is wearing.

When we pay attention, we upload other clues that aid in memory, like visual and auditory information from our environment. I experience this all the time when hiking and listening to an audiobook. When I go back to the story later, and it very often starts up again somewhere I wasn’t, (thanks Apple), and I rewind or fast-forward to find my spot, I often recall where I was in my hike as I re-listen to the words that I had heard in that place. I have attached cues that help me to recall information. Mostly useless here, but still it proves it to me.

When you are keeping that experience in your mind, that is when your brain starts storing the extra sensory data.

Does Controversial Advertising Sell Product?

Dave Posted by Dave Does Controversial Advertising Sell Product?

An ad for Just Liquid Soap states, “If you aren’t totally clean, you’re filthy.”

I recall fighting tooth and nail over some of the ideas my creative team would come up with in years gone by. With a sly smile, they would show me something that was way out there, something that could be argued was in the land of controversy…while others might say, in the land of bad taste.

“But it will get attention! And that is what we are all about! It will stop people in their tracks and make them pay attention."

“But it will royally screw up their brand," I would say.

Here’s one that you might remember that went viral in 24 hours and got 15 million views on YouTube in just eight days. The ad agency was tasked with dealing with Kmart’s out-of-stock issues. It’s absolutely brilliant and funny, but…

youtu.be/I03UmJbK0lA

…but, it created backlash and made it onto the Today Show asking if the ad went too far. Messages to kill the ad flooded in, but Kmart’s agency followed with another brilliantly conceived, but…

http://youtu.be/m1yir-p68xM

…but maybe too much and off-brand, with kids sounding like they’re swearing on TV.

Kmart is a family-friendly retailer. And this campaign was counter to their brand image. It gained incredible attention, but did it sell product? Kmart’s sales fell over 2% in that quarter. The lesson learned here, I think, is that if you want to be controversial, it has to fit the brand and you have to create that edge in the shopping experience. Kmart didn’t and people who loved the ads found nothing new and exciting at Kmart. And those that hated the ads shied away from shopping there.

Here’s one that worked, but everything fits (and I received it in our office Christmas gift exchange…and (testimonial warning) it works!)…

http://youtu.be/ZKLnhuzh9uY

32 million views on YouTube and a 90% increase in sales, expected to climb to $60 million. Reactions to the ad were extremely positive.

Here’s one that failed miserably and shocked everyone associated with the brand and was pulled the same day it ran…

http://bcove.me/561if14m

I think you can see why. Of all things, “suicide” doesn’t sell. It can have impact, but look out!

I find that when we can fit the sentiment of the ad with the sentiment built into the brand, and we can be controversial, we can win. Otherwise, controversy can stink in advertising.

(with help from Terry O’Reilly at CBC’s “Under the Influence”)

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